Building the Canal to Save Chicago

Chapter 9 Photos

Chicago River Improvement

BC-Photo 9.1
BC-Photo 9.1

August 29, 1898. A preconstruction survey of structure settlement for a railroad station next to the South Branch of the Chicago River. Numerous structures were surveyed prior and subsequent to construction of the Bypass Channel to provide information in the event of damage claims from adjoining property owners. (MWRD photo, disc 5, image 26)

BC-Photo 9.2
BC-Photo 9.2

August 31, 1898. Work is underway in construction of the Bypass Channel. Looking north from under the Jackson Boulevard Bridge, the South Branch is to the right. The beams running from left to right form the roof of the Bypass Channel; the upstream entrance to the channel is just beyond the track-mounted derrick. (MWRD photo, disc 5, image 34)

BC-Photo 9.3
BC-Photo 9.3

March 8, 1899. Looking north from south of the Jackson Boulevard Bridge shows work in progress on construction of the Bypass Channel. The center pier of the bridge is in the center of the view and the Bypass Channel is beneath the beams crossing the view and passes to the left of the center pier. (MWRD photo, disc 8, image 64)

BC-Photo 9.4
BC-Photo 9.4

August 17, 1899. Construction of the Bypass Channel under the West Side Elevated Railroad Bridge next to a railroad warehouse. The railroad bridge in view consists of two trusses west of the west bascule bridge leaf and pier. The two trusses span the Bypass Channel and ground level railroad tracks and terminal buildings. (MWRD photo, disc 9, image 43)

BC-Photo 9.5
BC-Photo 9.5

August 17, 1899. Construction of the Bypass Channel. The west pier and foundation of the bascule span of the West Side Elevated Railroad Bridge is seen in the center; the Bypass Channel is to the left of the pier. The South Branch is to the right. The elevated railroad crossed the South Branch between Jackson Boulevard and Van Buren Street. Behind the railroad bridge is the Jackson Boulevard Bridge, a center pier swing bridge. (MWRD photo, disc 9, image 45)

BC-Photo 9.6
BC-Photo 9.6

Looking north toward the Adams Street Bridge and the upstream entrance to the Bypass Channel, October 5, 1899: Placement of the steel beams forming the roof of the Bypass Channel. (MWRD photo, disc 13, image 27)

BC-Photo 9.7
BC-Photo 9.7

October 5, 1899. The inside of the river wall cofferdam of the Bypass Channel. The dipper dredge was used to excavate sediment in the South Branch along the river wall and in front of the entrance and exit of the Bypass Channel. The underside of the West Side Elevated Railroad Bridge is seen to the left behind the dredge. (MWRD photo, disc 13, image 29)

BC-Photo 9.8
BC-Photo 9.8

October 5, 1899. A full view of the dipper dredge. The West Side Elevated Railroad Bridge is in the left background. (MWRD photo, disc 13, image 31)

BC-Photo 9.9
BC-Photo 9.9

In the Bypass Channel, looking north from Van Buren Street, April 6, 1900. Use of the channel was not initially needed to effect the reversal of the river because flows were far below the maximum. (MWRD photo, disc 14, image 22)

BC-Photo 9.10
BC-Photo 9.10

In the Bypass Channel, looking south from the entrance north of Jackson Boulevard, April 6, 1900. Remnants of the structure are visible in 2011 along the west bank of the South Branch north of the Van Buren Street Bridge, next to the Union Station tracks. (MWRD photo, disc 14, image 19)

BC-Photo 9.11
BC-Photo 9.11

April 27, 1904. The upstream entrance to the Bypass Channel on the South Branch. The entrance is below the railing and steel girder in the lower left quarter of the view. The Jackson Boulevard Bridge center pier is between the river channel and the Bypass Channel. Beyond Jackson Boulevard is the two truss spans of the West Side Elevated Railroad Bridge. The double leaf bascule railroad bridge is to the left of the truss spans. (MWRD photo, disc 25, image 30)