Building the Canal to Save Chicago

Chapter 10 Photos, 29–55

(photos 1–28 here)

Bridges

BC-Photo 10.29
BC-Photo 10.29

October 18, 1899. The construction of the Stephens Street viaduct under the Santa Fe Railroad adjacent to Section 8. The timber trestle under the railroad cars will be removed and replaced with steel girders spanning between the concrete abutments. The timber piles will be cut below grade, the remaining fill removed and paving for Stephen Street completed. (MWRD photo, disc 13, image 48)

BC-Photo 10.30
BC-Photo 10.30

September 11, 1899. The completed Southwest Boulevard/Western Avenue Bridge over the Main Channel. This is a four lane, center pier, swing bridge. Water is in the Main Channel at this point because this is connected to the South Branch. The Main Channel is blocked by a fill across the channel at the Eight-Track Bridge construction site. This view is from the temporary trestle of the Eight-Track Bridge crossing, looking northeasterly. (MWRD photo, disc 9, image 76)

BC-Photo 10.31
BC-Photo 10.31

August 26, 1901. The interim Eight-Track Railroad Bridge crossing the Main Channel in Section O. The four through truss spans between piers in the channel will be replaced with four bascule spans for the permanent bridge. This interim arrangement provided for the Main Channel excavation to be completed and railroad traffic to be unimpeded. The design of the bascule spans was not awarded until late in 1899. (MWRD photo, disc 17, image 19)

BC-Photo 10.32
BC-Photo 10.32

January 10, 1899. The completed Chicago, Madison and Northern Railroad Bridge in Section N. This is a two track, center pier, swing bridge. Work is in progress to complete the excavation of the Main Channel. This view is from the southerly bank, looking northeasterly. (MWRD photo, disc 4126, image 98)

BC-Photo 10.33
BC-Photo 10.33

August 22, 1899. The completed Kedzie Avenue Bridge over the Main Channel. This is a two lane, center pier, swing bridge. This view is from the southerly bank, looking westerly. (MWRD photo, disc 9, image 51)

BC-Photo 10.34
BC-Photo 10.34

June 28, 1900. The completed Santa Fe Railroad Bridge in Section N. This bridge is a two track, center pier, swing bridge. Water has been flowing in the Main Channel, the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, since January 17, 1900. This view is from the southerly bank, looking westerly. (MWRD photo, disc 15, image 33)

BC-Photo 10.35
BC-Photo 10.35

December 29, 1900. The completed Belt Line or Chicago & Western Illinois Railway Bridge in Section K. This is one of the bridges completed after the Main Channel was placed in service. It is a four track, center pier, swing bridge, with two tracks within the through truss and one track on each side outside the through truss. (MWRD photo, disc 16, image 92)

BC-Photo 10.36
BC-Photo 10.36

December 29, 1900. The completed Belt Line or Chicago & Western Illinois Railway Bridge in Section K. This is one of the bridges completed after the Main Channel was placed in service. It is a four track, center pier, swing bridge, with two tracks within the through truss and one track on each side outside the through truss. (MWRD photo, disc 16, image 92)

BC-Photo 10.37
BC-Photo 10.37

June 28, 1899. The completed Summit-Lyons Road Bridge in Section F. This is a two lane, center pier, swing bridge. The view is from the top of the northwest bank of the Main Channel downstream of the bridge. Excavation of the Main Channel is nearing completion in this portion of Section F. Beneath the left span of the bridge is seen the reduction in size of the Earth Section of the Main Channel. (MWRD photo, disc 9, image 2)

BC-Photo 10.38
BC-Photo 10.38

April 13, 1899. The completed Chicago Terminal Railroad Bridge in Section E. This is a two track, center pier, swing bridge. This view is from the top of the northwest bank looking northeasterly. (MWRD photo, disc 11, image 87)

BC-Photo 10.39
BC-Photo 10.39

May 14, 1900. The completed Willow Springs Road Bridge. This is a two lane, bobtail, swing bridge. The view is from the top of the southeast canal wall of the transition from trapezoidal to rectangular cross-section of the Main Channel, looking southwesterly or downstream. Water has been flowing in the Chicago sanitary and Ship Canal since January 17, 1900. (MWRD photo, disc 13, image 87)

BC-Photo 10.40
BC-Photo 10.40

April 3, 1900. The completed Santa Fe Railroad Bridge in Section 8. This is a two track, bobtail, swing bridge. This view is taken from the northwest side of the Main Channel looking in a southerly direction. Water has been flowing in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal since January 17, 1900. (MWRD photo, disc 14, image 24)

BC-Photo 10.41
BC-Photo 10.41

July 6, 1900. The completed Lemont Road (Stephen Street) Bridge. This is a two lane, bobtail, swing bridge. This view is from the Santa Fe Railroad Bridge looking southwesterly in the downstream direction. Water has been flowing in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal since January 17, 1900. (MWRD photo, disc 15, image 58)

BC-Photo 10.42
BC-Photo 10.42

September 6, 1899. The temporary timber trestle bridge built for the Western Stone Company at the division between Section 9 and 10. The company required rail access from the company stone quarry west of the Main Channel to the I&M Canal east of the Main Channel. The company used the I&M Canal to transport its quarried rock to points upstream and downstream. This trestle was removed prior to the end of 1899. (MWRD photo, disc 9, image 63)

BC-Photo 10.43
BC-Photo 10.43

August 8, 1899. The completed Romeoville Road Bridge and the temporary timber trestle. The permanent structure is a two lane, bobtail, swing bridge. At the east end of the bridge is a ramp enclosed in masonry walls to accommodate two right angle turns in the road to cross the Santa Fe Railroad tracks that are close to the Main Channel. (MWRD photo, disc 9, image 38)

BC-Photo 10.44
BC-Photo 10.44

April 13, 1899. The completed Santa Fe Railroad Bridge over the Des Plaines River adjacent to Section F. This is a two track, six span, fixed girder bridge. This view is taken from the downstream side of the bridge on the west bank of the river looking in a northerly direction. (MWRD photo, disc 11, image 75)

BC-Photo 10.45
BC-Photo 10.45

April 13, 1899. The completed Summit-Lyons Road Bridge over the Des Plaines River adjacent to Section F. The new bridge is a two lane, through truss on new piers. The original five fixed truss segments were incorporated into the new crossing on rebuilt piers. (MWRD photo, disc 11, image 78)

BC-Photo 10.46
BC-Photo 10.46

September 15, 1899. The nearly completed Chicago Terminal Railroad Bridge over the Des Plaines River adjacent to Section E. The new bridge is a two lane, through truss. The original three fixed truss spans were incorporated into the new crossing on rebuilt piers. See Photos 10.25, 10.26, and 10.27 for additional detail. (MWRD photo, disc 13, image 1)

BC-Photo 10.47
BC-Photo 10.47

March 1, 1899. The Santa Fe Railroad Bridge over the Des Plaines River adjacent to Section 8. This is a two track, fixed plate girder, 12 span bridge. This view is from the southeast river bank descending bank looking northerly. (MWRD photo, disc 8, image 52)

BC-Photo 10.48
BC-Photo 10.48

January 27, 1899. The Lemont Road Bridge over the Des Plaines River adjacent to Section 8. This is two lane, fixed timber truss and beam, 10 span bridge. This view is from the southeast river bank looking northerly. (MWRD photo, disc 11, image 50)

BC-Photo 10.49
BC-Photo 10.49

February 27, 1900. The Lockport Road Bridge over the Des Plaines River in Section 16. This is a two lane, through truss, three span bridge. This view is from the center of the road looking west. The wide expanse of water is the new Tail Race Channel downstream of the Lockport Controlling Works. (MWRD photo, disc 14, image 33)

BC-Photo 10.50
BC-Photo 10.50

August 4, 1899. The Wire Mills Road Bridge over the Des Plaines River in Section 16. The new structure is a two lane, through truss, three span bridge. The original bridge was a single span and this span was incorporated into the new bridge. More spans were needed to cross the Tail Race Channel. This view is from the east river bank looking southwesterly. (MWRD photo, disc 9, image 23)

BC-Photo 10.51
BC-Photo 10.51

This undated photo shows the Elgin, Joliet and Eastern Railroad Bridge over the Des Plaines River at the division between Sections 16 and 17. The new bridge consists of one through truss and four truss spans. The through truss provides for navigation clearance over the new river channel. These five spans were added to plate girder spans over railroad tracks and the I&M Canal. (MWRD photo, disc 4126, image 67)

BC-Photo 10.52
BC-Photo 10.52

June 29, 1900. The Cass Street Bridge in Section 18. This is a two lane, through truss single span bridge over the Des Plaines River. The I&M Canal lies to the west of the river on the other side of the low wall. The canal is spanned by a plate girder bridge. This view is from the east bank looking southerly. (MWRD photo, disc 15, image 39)

BC-Photo 10.53
BC-Photo 10.53

April 20, 1900. The Jefferson Street Bridge in Section 18. This is a two lane, through truss, two span bridge over the Des Plaines River. The original bridge over the I&M Canal to the west remained in service. The temporary bridge is seen behind the new bridge. The original bridge was a multi-span masonry arch. (MWRD photo, disc 14, image 6)

BC-Photo 10.54
BC-Photo 10.54

June 29, 1900. The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad Bridge in Section 18. The new single span section of this bridge is a four track, fixed plate girder. The truss span in this view is the original bridge over the I&M Canal to the west of the river. This view is from the east bank looking southerly. (MWRD photo, disc 15, image 37)

BC-Photo 10.55
BC-Photo 10.55

July 6, 1900. The Stephen Street viaduct under the Santa Fe Railroad adjacent to Section 8. This is a two track, fixed plate girder, single span bridge. (MWRD photo, disc 15, image 44)